Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

Human rights intertwine with archaeology around the work that is done, the material on which the work is done, the material that the work produces, the labourers who do the work and the communities amongst whom the work is done; equally, they intersect over the work that is not done, the material that is neglected, the narratives that are untold and the people who are marginalised.

I’m happy to say that I’ve contributed a chapter on the archaeological profession and human rights to key concepts in public archaeology, which is open access (OA), edited by Gabe Moshenska and published by UCL Press. (And he says that I don’t blog often enough, though he does have a proper job.)
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‘Archaeologists have enlightened Anatolian history… but the state has darkened archaeologists’ futures… [Anadolu tarihini arkeologlar aydınlattı… ama devlet arkeologların geleceğini kararttı…]’

As I will explain later today, from now on, I am going to be posting far less (even less) on unfree archaeology – though I will hopefully post some more about this particular subject. Indeed, hopefully, I will publish at least one article on resistance to unemployment in Turkey (and elsewhere).
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Volunteer, intern, worker? Invisible, marginalised, undervalued? The peer-reviewed, open-access Papers from the Institute of Archaeology (PIA @piajournal) want you to write about your experiences anonymously (or openly) for PIA Forum 2014 (#PIAForum2014). Contact senior editor Hana Koriech. This could be a step towards progress in the movement against free archaeology and other exploitation in cultural heritage labour.

Over on Conflict Antiquities, I’ve put up a note on the (open) question of how to acknowledge and/or protect public sources, who might be persecuted for statements on social media, and who might delete those statements in order to protect themselves. The problem is more one of unfree archaeology, so I’m not entirely sure why it’s over there, but there it is (in both senses).

Doug Rocks-Macqueen (@openaccessarch) and Chris Webster (@ArcheoWebby) have meticulously (and patiently, up-to-the-last-minute) edited an open access book on blogging archaeology.
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Last year, Kayıp Kültür Varlıkları (Looted Heritage) wrote a post about Ataturk and archaeologists’ employment (Atatürk ve Arkeolog İstihdamı), which addressed the problems faced by the profession in Turkey in the early Twentieth Century and in the early Twenty-First Century…
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Yesterday, I submitted a proposal for an article about unpaid internships in cultural industries. My initial screed thoughts were about the system as a whole, so I thought I might as well post them here.
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If you have evidence of blacklisting or other political subversion of the profession…
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When I started Conflict Antiquities, I occasionally went “off-topic” and discussed Turkish state restrictions on freedom of expression and access to information, or deep state ultra-nationalist propaganda (including the pollution of the public domain with false information in order to trick other authorities into blocking visas for international work). Now, there is public evidence for secret anti-academic and un-academic action against research and teaching.
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Funding is only going to get cut, so labour problems are only going to grow. In parallel, due to geographical inequity in cultural funding and the economy, the cultural as well as economic north-south divide (or south-east-elsewhere chasm) is only going to grow. Here’s the first of four examples in a run-down (or perhaps grind-down) of the latest bad news for the cultural heritage industry in the UK.
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